You will now hear 40 sentences. You have to write 1 word from each sentence. The words will be repeatedtwice after each sentence. Please pay attention.

Jennie – British English:

Jon – British English:

Spencer – American English:

1: That is simply too much. Write too And that was – too

2: They look so funny when they lose. Write lose And that was – lose

3: We went through hell to get here. Write through And that was – through

4: Is she really your friend? Write friend And that was – friend

5: We received the reward yesterday. Write received And that was – received

6: I don’t believe a word you say. Write believe And that was – believe

7: He’s their only son. Write their And that was – their

8: This is basically what I want you to do. Write basically And that was – basically

9: They only loved themselves. Write themselves And that was – themselves

10: He can’t talk to women. Write women And that was – women

11: Occasionally, we meet at the pub. Write occasionally And that was – occasionally

12: Please advise me on this issue. Write advise And that was – advise

13: Beginnings are always difficult. Write beginnings And that was – beginnings

14: Nourish your beliefs by honouring them. Write beliefs And that was – beliefs

15: Do you have a guilty conscience? Write conscience And that was – conscience

16: These people ought to be disciplined. Write disciplined And that was – disciplined

17: The deceased tend to lie very still. Write deceased And that was – deceased

18: We are happily married. Write happily And that was – happily

19: Is it all in one piece? Write piece And that was – piece

20: There were two different analyses. Write analyses And that was – analyses

21: It’s necessary for you to learn this. Write necessary And that was – necessary

22: This word is difficult to pronounce. Write pronounce And that was – pronounce

23: I have acquired proficiency in maths. Write acquired And that was – acquired

24: This is unforgettable. Write unforgettable And that was – unforgettable

25: The weather is awful today. Write weather And that was – weather

26: Which one do you like? Write which And that was – which

27: Apparently, we are doing just fine. Write apparently And that was – apparently

28: We are trying to run a business here. Write business And that was – business

29: He is a highly esteemed colleague. Write colleague And that was – colleague

30: I hope for a new government soon. Write government And that was – government

31: Successful people are often envied. Write successful And that was – successful

32: We seem to play two separate games. Write separate And that was – separate

33: This is really a noticeable change. Write noticeable And that was – noticeable

34: Independent people are hard to bully. Write independent And that was – independent

35: They have terrible rows every day. Write rows And that was – rows

36: Is this your best performance? Write your And that was – your

37: The tree is losing its leaves early. Write its And that was – its

38: They sing horribly. Write horribly And that was – horribly

39: She is prettier than me. Write than And that was – than

40: What’s the definition of love? Write definition And that was – definition

The Use of Force (1938)

by William Carlos Williams

(Word Count: 1564)

They were new patients to me, all I had was the name, Olson. Please come down as soon as you can, my
daughter is very sick.
When I arrived I was met by the mother, a big startled looking woman, very clean and apologetic who
merely said, Is this the doctor? and let me in. In the back, she added. You must excuse us, doctor, we have
her in the kitchen where it is warm. It is very damp here sometimes.
The child was fully dressed and sitting on her father’s lap near the kitchen table. He tried to get up, but I
motioned for him not to bother, took off my overcoat and started to look things over. I could see that they
were all very nervous, eyeing me up and down distrustfully. As often, in such cases, they weren’t telling me
more than they had to, it was up to me to tell them; that’s why they were spending three dollars on me.
The child was fairly eating me up with her cold, steady eyes, and no expression to her face whatever. She
did not move and seemed, inwardly, quiet; an unusually attractive little thing, and as strong as a heifer in
appearance. But her face was flushed, she was breathing rapidly, and I realized that she had a high fever.
She had magnificent blonde hair, in profusion. One of those picture children often reproduced in advertising
leaflets and the photogravure sections of the Sunday papers.
She’s had a fever for three days, began the father and we don’t know what it comes from. My wife has
given her things, you know, like people do, but it don’t do no good. And there’s been a lot of sickness
around. So we tho’t you’d better look her over and tell us what is the matter.
As doctors often do I took a trial shot at it as a point of departure. Has she had a sore throat?
Both parents answered me together, No . . . No, she says her throat don’t hurt her.
Does your throat hurt you? added the mother to the child. But the little girl’s expression didn’t change nor
did she move her eyes from my face.
Have you looked?
I tried to, said the mother, but I couldn’t see.
As it happens we had been having a number of cases of diphtheria in the school to which this child went
during that month and we were all, quite apparently, thinking of that, though no one had as yet spoken of
the thing.
Well, I said, suppose we take a look at the throat first. I smiled in my best professional manner and asking
for the child’s first name I said, come on, Mathilda, open your mouth and let’s take a look at your throat.
Nothing doing.
Aw, come on, I coaxed, just open your mouth wide and let me take a look. Look, I said opening both hands
wide, I haven’t anything in my hands. Just open up and let me see.
Such a nice man, put in the mother. Look how kind he is to you. Come on, do what he tells you to. He won’t
hurt you.
At that I ground my teeth in disgust. If only they wouldn’t use the word “hurt” I might be able to get
somewhere. But I did not allow myself to be hurried or disturbed but speaking quietly and slowly I
approached the child again.
As I moved my chair a little nearer suddenly with one catlike movement both her hands clawed instinctively
for my eyes and she almost reached them too. In fact she knocked my glasses flying and they fell, though
unbroken, several feet away from me on the kitchen floor.
Both the mother and father almost turned themselves inside out in embarrassment and apology. You bad
girl, said the mother, taking her and shaking her by one arm. Look what you’ve done. The nice man . . .
For heaven’s sake, I broke in. Don’t call me a nice man to her. I’m here to look at her throat on the chance
that she might have diphtheria and possibly die of it. But that’s nothing to her. Look here, I said to the child,
we’re going to look at your throat. You’re old enough to understand what I’m saying. Will you open it now by
yourself or shall we have to open it for you)
Not a move. Even her expression hadn’t changed. Her breaths however were coming faster and faster.
Then the battle began. I had to do it. I had to have a throat culture for her own protection. But first I told the
parents that it was entirely up to them. I explained the danger but said that I would not insist on a throat
examination so long as they would take the responsibility.
If you don’t do what the doctor says you’ll have to go to the hospital, the mother admonished her severely.
Oh yeah? I had to smile to myself. After all, I had already fallen in love with the savage brat, the parents
were contemptible to me. In the ensuing struggle they grew more and more abject, crushed, exhausted
while she surely rose to magnificent heights of insane fury of effort bred of her terror of me.
The father tried his best, and he was a big man but the fact that she was his daughter, his shame at her
behavior and his dread of hurting her made him release her just at the critical times when I had almost
achieved success, till I wanted to kill him. But his dread also that she might have diphtheria made him tell
me to go on, go on though he himself was almost fainting, while the mother moved back and forth behind
us raising and lowering her hands in an agony of apprehension.
Put her in front of you on your lap, I ordered, and hold both her wrists.
But as soon as he did the child let out a scream. Don’t, you’re hurting me. Let go of my hands. Let them go
I tell you. Then she shrieked terrifyingly, hysterically. Stop it! Stop it! You’re killing me!
Do you think she can stand it, doctor! said the mother.
You get out, said the husband to his wife. Do you want her to die of diphtheria?
Come on now, hold her, I said.
Then I grasped the child’s head with my left hand and tried to get the wooden tongue depressor between
her teeth. She fought, with clenched teeth, desperately! But now I also had grown furious–at a child. I
tried to hold myself down but I couldn’t. I know how to expose a throat for inspection. And I did my best.
When finally I got the wooden spatula behind the last teeth and just the point of it into the mouth cavity, she
opened up for an instant but before I could see anything she came down again and gripping the wooden
blade between her molars she reduced it to splinters before I could get it out again.
Aren’t you ashamed, the mother yelled at her. Aren’t you ashamed to act like that in front of the doctor?
Get me a smooth-handled spoon of some sort, I told the mother. We’re going through with this. The
child’s mouth was already bleeding. Her tongue was cut and she was screaming in wild hysterical shrieks.
Perhaps I should have desisted and come back in an hour or more. No doubt it would have been better.
But I have seen at least two children lying dead in bed of neglect in such cases, and feeling that I must
get a diagnosis now or never I went at it again. But the worst of it was that I too had got beyond reason. I
could have torn the child apart in my own fury and enjoyed it. It was a pleasure to attack her. My face was
burning with it.
The damned little brat must be protected against her own idiocy, one says to one’s self at such times.
Others must be protected against her. It is a social necessity. And all these things are true. But a blind fury,
a feeling of adult shame, bred of a longing for muscular release are the operatives. One goes on to the end.
In a final unreasoning assault I overpowered the child’s neck and jaws. I forced the heavy silver spoon back
of her teeth and down her throat till she gagged. And there it was–both tonsils covered with membrane.
She had fought valiantly to keep me from knowing her secret. She had been hiding that sore throat for
three days at least and lying to her parents in order to escape just such an outcome as this.
Now truly she was furious. She had been on the defensive before but now she attacked. Tried to get off her
father’s lap and fly at me while tears of defeat blinded her eyes.

Comprehension:

1)

The Olsons have asked the narrator (the doctor) to come because

a) their daughter is very sick.

b) Mrs. Olson has had a fever for weeks.

c) he is their good friend.

d) he is their business partner.

2)

When the narrator arrives, he can see that

a) everybody is having a good time.

b) they are all nervous.

c) they are having a cup of tea.

d) the mother is crying.

3)

The child is

a) crying her eyes out.

b) screaming that she hates her parents.

c) a beautiful little girl.

d) dirty and weak.

4)

The narrator fears that the girl

a) has killed her brother.

b) has eaten her mother’s pills.

c) has swallowed a coin.

d) has diphtheria.

5)

The narrator is annoyed because

a) the father tells him that he has no money.

b) the mother tells her daughter that the narrator won’t hurt her.

c) the girl bites him.

d) he can’t find his stethoscope.

6)

When the narrator approaches the girl, she

a) opens her mouth.

b) kicks his shin.

c) knocks his glasses flying.

d) Tells him to get lost.

7)

The father tries to open his daughter’s mouth, but he

a) is not strong enough.

b) has to wash his hands first.

c) starts to cry.

d) is afraid to hurt his daughter.

8)

The narrator

a) thinks that the girl has to be protected against her own idiocy.

b) chooses to send the girl to the hospital.

c) Wants the mother to force her daughter’s mouth open.

d) gives up.

9)

The girl’s secret is that

a) she hasn’t brushed her teeth for a long time.

b) she has had a sore throat for days and has lied to her parents about it.

c) her father has knocked out one of her teeth.

d) she is dead scared of strangers.

10)

In the end the girl

a) feels defeated and angry.

b) falls asleep

c) gets a present.

d) is happy that she opened her mouth.

Please choose the correct option for each sentence.

1. There _________ many bottles in the fridge.

is
are

2. Large quantities of beer _________ been spilled in the streets.

have
has

3. Why they didn’t show up _________ quite clear.

isn’t
aren’t

4. It’s weird that the good news ________ make him happy.

don’t
doesn’t

5. Millions of people _________ starving in Africa.

is
are

6. My daughter _________ her arm yesterday.

break
breaked
broke
broken
broak

7. I __________ a lecture the other day on the benefits of exercising.

give
gived
gave
given

8. The students have ________ that they want new iPads.

write
wrote
writing
written

9. They all claimed that John had ________ that malicious letter.

send
sent
sended

10. She ________ him for granted, which is why he left her.

take
takes
took
taked
taken

11. It has been a _________ day.

wonderfull
wonderful
wonderfully
wonderfuly

12. This pasta smells ________.

good
goodly
well

13. I was ______in love with my teacher last year.

mad
madly

14. The band plays ___________ every single night.

excellent
excellently

15. It seems that models have to be __________ thin.

incredibly
incredible
incrediblely

16. My neighbour, _____ is a fool, has a huge lawnmower and a tiny lawn.

whom
that
who
which
whose

17. The baby was beautiful, ______ was surprising.

there
which
what

18. The actress, ______ dress was made of transparent plastic, attracted attention.

whose
who
which
that

19. God, in ________ we trust, is our lord and saviour.

who
that
which
whom
whose

20. Do you like the girl ______ plays the piano?

who
whose
which
whom

21. What do you think of the ________ hat?

woman’s
womens
womans’
womans

22. The firefighters saved the poor _________ lives.

peoples
people’s
peoples’

23. Don’t mess with a ______ makeup!

girl’s
girls’
girls

The following sentences have been jumbled. Please reconstruct the sentences in order for them to make sense.

(Correct sentences)

1) Men who love to chew tobacco look foolish.

2) In this part of the world people are often quite rich.

3) Are young women more intelligent than young men?

4) It seems that old women tend to be very fond of babies.

You will now hear 40 sentences. You have to write 1 word from each sentence. The words will be repeatedtwice after each sentence. Please pay attention.

Jennie – British English:

Jon – British English:

Spencer – American English:

1: That is simply too much. Write too And that was – too

2: They look so funny when they lose. Write lose And that was – lose

3: We went through hell to get here. Write through And that was – through

4: Is she really your friend? Write friend And that was – friend

5: We received the reward yesterday. Write received And that was – received

6: I don’t believe a word you say. Write believe And that was – believe

7: He’s their only son. Write their And that was – their

8: This is basically what I want you to do. Write basically And that was – basically

9: They only loved themselves. Write themselves And that was – themselves

10: He can’t talk to women. Write women And that was – women

11: Occasionally, we meet at the pub. Write occasionally And that was – occasionally

12: Please advise me on this issue. Write advise And that was – advise

13: Beginnings are always difficult. Write beginnings And that was – beginnings

14: Nourish your beliefs by honouring them. Write beliefs And that was – beliefs

15: Do you have a guilty conscience? Write conscience And that was – conscience

16: These people ought to be disciplined. Write disciplined And that was – disciplined

17: The deceased tend to lie very still. Write deceased And that was – deceased

18: We are happily married. Write happily And that was – happily

19: Is it all in one piece? Write piece And that was – piece

20: There were two different analyses. Write analyses And that was – analyses

21: It’s necessary for you to learn this. Write necessary And that was – necessary

22: This word is difficult to pronounce. Write pronounce And that was – pronounce

23: I have acquired proficiency in maths. Write acquired And that was – acquired

24: This is unforgettable. Write unforgettable And that was – unforgettable

25: The weather is awful today. Write weather And that was – weather

26: Which one do you like? Write which And that was – which

27: Apparently, we are doing just fine. Write apparently And that was – apparently

28: We are trying to run a business here. Write business And that was – business

29: He is a highly esteemed colleague. Write colleague And that was – colleague

30: I hope for a new government soon. Write government And that was – government

31: Successful people are often envied. Write successful And that was – successful

32: We seem to play two separate games. Write separate And that was – separate

33: This is really a noticeable change. Write noticeable And that was – noticeable

34: Independent people are hard to bully. Write independent And that was – independent

35: They have terrible rows every day. Write rows And that was – rows

36: Is this your best performance? Write your And that was – your

37: The tree is losing its leaves early. Write its And that was – its

38: They sing horribly. Write horribly And that was – horribly

39: She is prettier than me. Write than And that was – than

40: What’s the definition of love? Write definition And that was – definition

Shooting An Elephant, (excerpt)

by George Orwell, 1936

(Word Count: 1603)

In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter. No one had the guts to raise a riot, but if a European woman went through the bazaars alone somebody would probably spit betel juice over her dress. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee (another Burman) looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter. This happened more than once. In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves. […]

All this was perplexing and upsetting. For at that time I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better. Theoretically – and secretly, of course – I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British. As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear. In a job like that you see the dirty work of Empire at close quarters. […] One day something happened which in a roundabout way was enlightening. It was a tiny incident in itself, but it gave me a better glimpse than I had had before of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic governments act. Early one morning the sub-inspector at a police station in the other end of the town rang me up on the phone and said that an elephant was ravaging the bazaar. Would I please come and do something about it? […] The Burmese population had no weapons and were quite helpless against it. It had already destroyed somebody\’s bamboo hut, killed a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock; also it had met the municipal rubbish van and, when the driver jumped out and took to his heels, had turned the van over and inflicted violences upon it. The Burmese sub-inspector and some Indian constables were waiting for me in the quarter where the elephant had been seen. It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside. I remember that it was a cloudy, stuffy morning at the beginning of the rains. We began questioning the people as to where the elephant had gone and, as usual, failed to get any definite information. […] I had almost made up my mind that the whole story was a pack of lies, when we heard yells a little distance away. There was a loud, scandalized cry of \”Go away, child! Go away this instant!\” and an old woman with a switch in her hand came round the corner of a hut, violently shooing away a crowd of naked children. Some more women followed, clicking their tongues and exclaiming; evidently there was something that the children ought not to have seen. I rounded the hut and saw a man\’s dead body sprawling in the mud. He was an Indian, a black Dravidian coolie, almost naked, and he could not have been dead many minutes. The people said that the elephant had come suddenly upon him round the corner of the hut, caught him with its trunk, put its foot on his back and ground him into the earth. This was the rainy season and the ground was soft, and his face had scored a trench a foot deep and a couple of yards long. He was lying on his belly with arms crucified and head sharply twisted to one side. His face was coated with mud, the eyes wide open, the teeth bared and grinning with an expression of unendurable agony. […] As soon as I saw the dead man I sent an orderly to a friend\’s house nearby to borrow an elephant rifle. I had already sent back the pony, not wanting it to go mad with fright and throw me if it smelt the elephant.

The orderly came back in a few minutes with a rifle and five cartridges, and meanwhile some Burmans had arrived and told us that the elephant was in the paddy fields below, only a few hundred yards away. As I started forward practically the whole population of the quarter flocked out of the houses and followed me. They had seen the rifle and were all shouting excitedly that I was going to shoot the elephant. […]

It made me vaguely uneasy. I had no intention of shooting the elephant – I had merely sent for the rifle to defend myself if necessary – and it is always unnerving to have a crowd following you. I marched down the hill, looking and feeling a fool, with the rifle over my shoulder and an ever-growing army of people jostling at my heels. […]

I had halted on the road. As soon as I saw the elephant I knew with perfect certainty that I ought not to shoot him. It is a serious matter to shoot a working elephant – it is comparable to destroying a huge and costly piece of machinery – and obviously one ought not to do it if it can possibly be avoided. And at that distance, peacefully eating, the elephant looked no more dangerous than a cow. I thought then and I think now that his attack of \”must\” was already passing off; in which case he would merely wander harmlessly about until the mahout [the elephant trainer] came back and caught him. Moreover, I did not in the least want to shoot him. I decided that I would watch him for a little while to make sure that he did not turn savage again, and then go home.

But at that moment I glanced round at the crowd that had followed me. It was an immense crowd, two thousand at the least and growing every minute. It blocked the road for a long distance on either side. I looked at the sea of yellow faces above the garish clothes-faces all happy and excited over this bit of fun, all certain that the elephant was going to be shot. They were watching me as they would watch a conjurer about to perform a trick. They did not like me, but with the magical rifle in my hands I was momentarily worth watching. And suddenly I realized that I should have to shoot the elephant after all. The people expected it of me and I had got to do it; I could feel their two thousand wills pressing me forward, irresistibly. And it was at this moment, as I stood there with the rifle in my hands, that I first grasped the hollowness, the futility of the white man\’s dominion in the East. Here was I, the white man with his gun, standing in front of the unarmed native crowd – seemingly the leading actor of the piece; but in reality I was only an absurd puppet pushed to and fro by the will of those yellow faces behind. I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys. He becomes a sort of hollow, posing dummy, the conventionalized figure of a sahib. For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the \”natives,\” and so in every crisis he has got to do what the \”natives\” expect of him. He wears a mask, and his face grows to fit it. I had got to shoot the elephant. I had committed myself to doing it when I sent for the rifle. A sahib has got to act like a sahib; he has got to appear resolute, to know his own mind and do definite things. To come all that way, rifle in hand, with two thousand people marching at my heels, and then to trail feebly away, having done nothing – no, that was impossible. The crowd would laugh at me. And my whole life, every white man\’s life in the East, was one long struggle not to be laughed at. […] When I pulled the trigger I did not hear the bang or feel the kick – one never does when a shot goes home – but I heard the devilish roar of glee that went up from the crowd. […]

Afterwards, of course, there were endless discussions about the shooting of the elephant. The owner was furious, but he was only an Indian and could do nothing. Besides, legally I had done the right thing, for a mad elephant has to be killed, like a mad dog, if its owner fails to control it. Among the Europeans opinion was divided. The older men said I was right, the younger men said it was a damn shame to shoot an elephant for killing a coolie, because an elephant was worth more than any damn Coringhee coolie. And afterwards I was very glad that the coolie had been killed; it put me legally in the right and it gave me a sufficient pretext for shooting the elephant. I often wondered whether any of the others grasped that I had done it solely to avoid looking a fool.

Please answer the following questions about the story that you have just read.

1. The action takes place in

India.
Burma.
England.
South Africa.

2. The narrator

is very popular.
is hated by large numbers of people.
loves his job.
hates the local population.

3. The narrator believes that British imperial rule is

necessary to educate the local population.
the natural order of things.
an evil that he doesn’t really want to be a part of.
just perfect because it will make him rich.

4. The reason why the narrator begins to think about the nature of imperialism is that

an elephant has ravaged the bazaar.
he has to kill a man.
everybody is extremely poor.
he can never be alone.

5. The local population can’t handle the dangerous situation because

they are too afraid.
they can’t come to a decision.
they are just too inactive by nature to do anything about it.
they don’t have any weapons.

6. The worst thing that happens is that the elephant

runs away.
starts chasing a group of children.
kills a man in a very disturbing manner.
destroys a house.

7. Shooting the elephant is

good because it provides lots of food for the hungry population.
similar to destroying expensive machinery.
necessary because the elephant always eats the farmers’ crops.
something that has be done to make sure that there aren’t too many elephants around

8. Just before the narrator shoots the elephant, he realizes that

the white men, who rule the colony, are in fact ruled by the local population.
killing the elephant will make him feel like a man.
white men and locals ought to be equals.
elephants are amazing creatures with feelings that should be respected.

9. The narrator shoots the elephant because

he wants to make sure that the locals remember him always.
it makes him feel powerful.
he finds it amusing.
he doesn’t want to look like a fool.

10. The furious owner can’t do anything about the shooting of his elephant because

elephants are worthless creatures.
white men can do whatever they like.
he is only an Indian, and the narrator has legally done the right thing.
according to the law no Indian can file a complaint against a white man.

Please choose the correct option for each sentence.

1. There _________ many bottles in the fridge.

is
are

2. Large quantities of beer _________ been spilled in the streets.

have
has

3. Why they didn’t show up _________ quite clear.

isn’t
aren’t

4. It’s weird that the good news ________ make him happy.

don’t
doesn’t

5. Millions of people _________ starving in Africa.

is
are

6. The reason that they complained ______ known.

wasn’t
weren’t

7. 9 months ______ a long time to wait for a baby.

is
are

8. There _____ multiple reasons why many people think Messi is the best player ever.

is
are

9. The police ______ just been given the right to frisk people without reason.

has
have

10. ______the wife or the husband going to change that smelly diaper?

is
are

11. My daughter _________ her arm yesterday.

break
breaked
broke
broken
broak

12. I __________ a lecture the other day on the benefits of exercising.

give
gived
gave
given

13. The students have ________ that they want new iPads.

write
wrote
writing
written

14. They all claimed that John had ________ that malicious letter.

send
sent
sended

15. She ________ him for granted, which is why he left her.

take
takes
took
taked
taken

16. We have long _____ that you have a problem with alcohol.

know
knew
known
knowed
knowing

17. I see that you’ve ______ my pancakes!

eat
eats
ate
eated
aten
eaten

18. I’m sick and tired of him ______ up my misfortune constantly.

bring
brings
bringing
brought
bringed
brang

19. _______ whether to get children or not is the most important choice you’ll ever make.

choose
choosing
chose
chosen
chosing

20. Last year she ______ on to a hope that seemed impossible.

cling
clings
clang
clung
clinged
clinging

21. It has been a _________ day.

wonderfull
wonderful
wonderfully
wonderfuly

22. This pasta smells ________.

good
goodly
well

23. I was ______in love with my teacher last year.

mad
madly

24. The band plays ___________ every single night.

excellent
excellently

25. It seems that models have to be __________ thin.

incredibly
incredible
incrediblely

26. Italian women are _________ for their beauty.

famous
famously

27. She is the most __________ gifted woman that I’ve ever come across.

amazingly
amazing

28. We’ll play along until your ______ game becomes too boring.

terribly
terriblely
terrible

29. I swear to God that she is a _______ cook.

magnificent
magnificently

30. It was clear to see that she was _________ in love with her Gucci bag.

desperate
desperately

31. My neighbour, _____ is a fool, has a huge lawnmower and a tiny lawn.

whom
that
who
which
whose

32. The baby was beautiful, ______ was surprising.

there
which
what

33. The actress, ______ dress was made of transparent plastic, attracted attention.

whose
who
which
that

34. God, in ________ we trust, is our lord and saviour.

who
that
which
whom
whose

35. Do you like the girl ______ plays the piano?

who
whose
which
whom

36. I know _______ fault it is that you didn’t show up yesterday.

who
whose
which
that

37. In _______ of these stores can I find pencils?

whom
that
which
whose

38. This uncomfortable chair, ______ by the way is quite expensive, ought to be burned.

there
that
which
who

39. I want to marry a man ______ will do all the household chores and let me relax on the couch.

there
who
whom
which

40. We’ll never find out _____ it was exactly that scratched my car.

which
what
that
whose
where

41. What do you think of the ________ hat?

woman’s
womens
womans’
womans

42. The firefighters saved the poor _________ lives.

peoples
people’s
peoples’

43. Don’t mess with a ______ makeup!

girl’s
girls’
girls

44. Don’t you just love to hear those cute _______ voices when they sing together?

childrens
childs
child’s
children’s
childrens’

45. The special _______ talent is that he diverts attention from his players.

once
onces
ones
one’s
one’

46. It was the guy who lives next _____ decision to paint his house pink.

door
doors
door’s
door’

47. There were ________ packed with books on every single wall.

shelf
shelfs
shelves

48. She won ten ________ dollars in the lottery.

thousand
thousands

49. I simply hate it when ______ cry.

babys
babies

50. You have to make sure that your ______ are brushed properly.

tooths
teeth

51. Make sure that you stay away from the changing rooms reserved for ______ from now on!

woman
womans
woman’s
women
womens

52. We had more than ten thousand ________ before the hurricane.

sheeps
sheep
sheeps’

53. Will all passengers please take their _____ for take-off?

seat
seats
seats’
seat’s

54. Due to the accident, it took more than two and a half ______ to drive 20 miles.

hours
ours
hour
our

55. They spent hours searching for _______ on the Internet.

information
informations
informations’

The following sentences have been jumbled. Please reconstruct the sentences in order for them to make sense.

(Correct sentences)

1) To be honest I would love to go out with your sister.

2) Playing around will only result in a lot of trouble.

3) Next year I know that I am going to win the big prize.

4) When we arrived yesterday he had performed his sketch.

5) Men who love to chew tobacco look foolish.

6) In this part of the world people are often quite rich.

7) Are young women more intelligent than young men?

8) It seems that old women tend to be very fond of babies.

You will now hear 40 sentences. You have to write 1 word from each sentence. The words will be repeatedtwice after each sentence. Please pay attention.

Jennie – British English:

Jon – British English:

Spencer – American English:

1: You are too involved in this. Write too. And that was – too

2: He has never tried to lose. Write lose And that was – lose

3: Go through the third door on your right. Write through And that was – through

4: Do you want to be my friend? Write friend And that was – friend

5: We received the letter yesterday. Write received And that was – received

6: I believe in God. Write believe And that was – believe

7: Their hopes were very realistic. Write their And that was – their

8: She is basically a fool. Write basically And that was – basically

9: They are so full of themselves. Write themselves And that was – themselves

10: Do you prefer men or women? Write women And that was – women

11: This occasion calls for a celebration. Write occasion And that was – occasion

12: You should let him advise you. Write advise And that was – advise

13: In the beginning everything was fine. Write beginning And that was – beginning

14: Are your beliefs worth fighting for? Write beliefs And that was – beliefs

15: It weighs heavily on my conscience. Write conscience And that was – conscience

16: Discipline is important in the military. Write discipline And that was – discipline

17: I thought he was deceased. Write deceased And that was – deceased

18: They played happily all day long. Write happily And that was – happily

19: Do you want a piece of me? Write piece And that was – piece

20: All 4 analyses were excellent. Write analyses And that was – analyses

21: These are necessary precautions. Write necessary And that was – necessary

22: Learn to pronounce it correctly. Write pronounce And that was – pronounce

23: I acquired this horse last year. Write acquired And that was – acquired

24: What an unforgettable night. Write unforgettable And that was – unforgettable

25: The weather in Florida is just perfect. Write weather And that was – weather

26: Which one of you did it? Write which And that was – which

27: Apparently, the story wasn’t true. Write apparently And that was – apparently

28: It was a profitable business. Write business And that was – business

29: The colleagues make this job interesting. Write colleagues And that was – colleagues

30: Good government is rare these days. Write government And that was – government

31: They were very successful last year. Write successful And that was – successful

32: We sleep in separate beds. Write separate And that was – separate

33: Is it noticeable? Write noticeable And that was – noticeable

34: They wanted to be independent. Write independent And that was – independent

35: The girls had terrible rows. Write rows And that was – rows

36: What is your intention here? Write your And that was – your

37: Why is its nose bleeding? Write its And that was – its

38: What a horribly terrifying story. Write horribly And that was – horribly

39: You are better at spelling than her. Write than And that was – than

40: What an excellent definition. Write definition And that was – definition

Shooting An Elephant, (excerpt)

by George Orwell, 1936

(Word Count: 1603)

In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people – the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me. I was sub-divisional police officer of the town, and in an aimless, petty kind of way anti-European feeling was very bitter. No one had the guts to raise a riot, but if a European woman went through the bazaars alone somebody would probably spit betel juice over her dress. As a police officer I was an obvious target and was baited whenever it seemed safe to do so. When a nimble Burman tripped me up on the football field and the referee (another Burman) looked the other way, the crowd yelled with hideous laughter. This happened more than once. In the end the sneering yellow faces of young men that met me everywhere, the insults hooted after me when I was at a safe distance, got badly on my nerves. […]

All this was perplexing and upsetting. For at that time I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better. Theoretically – and secretly, of course – I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British. As for the job I was doing, I hated it more bitterly than I can perhaps make clear. In a job like that you see the dirty work of Empire at close quarters. […] One day something happened which in a roundabout way was enlightening. It was a tiny incident in itself, but it gave me a better glimpse than I had had before of the real nature of imperialism – the real motives for which despotic governments act. Early one morning the sub-inspector at a police station in the other end of the town rang me up on the phone and said that an elephant was ravaging the bazaar. Would I please come and do something about it? […] The Burmese population had no weapons and were quite helpless against it. It had already destroyed somebody\’s bamboo hut, killed a cow and raided some fruit-stalls and devoured the stock; also it had met the municipal rubbish van and, when the driver jumped out and took to his heels, had turned the van over and inflicted violences upon it. The Burmese sub-inspector and some Indian constables were waiting for me in the quarter where the elephant had been seen. It was a very poor quarter, a labyrinth of squalid bamboo huts, thatched with palmleaf, winding all over a steep hillside. I remember that it was a cloudy, stuffy morning at the beginning of the rains. We began questioning the people as to where the elephant had gone and, as usual, failed to get any definite information. […] I had almost made up my mind that the whole story was a pack of lies, when we heard yells a little distance away. There was a loud, scandalized cry of \”Go away, child! Go away this instant!\” and an old woman with a switch in her hand came round the corner of a hut, violently shooing away a crowd of naked children. Some more women followed, clicking their tongues and exclaiming; evidently there was something that the children ought not to have seen. I rounded the hut and saw a man\’s dead body sprawling in the mud. He was an Indian, a black Dravidian coolie, almost naked, and he could not have been dead many minutes. The people said that the elephant had come suddenly upon him round the corner of the hut, caught him with its trunk, put its foot on his back and ground him into the earth. This was the rainy season and the ground was soft, and his face had scored a trench a foot deep and a couple of yards long. He was lying on his belly with arms crucified and head sharply twisted to one side. His face was coated with mud, the eyes wide open, the teeth bared and grinning with an expression of unendurable agony. […] As soon as I saw the dead man I sent an orderly to a friend\’s house nearby to borrow an elephant rifle. I had already sent back the pony, not wanting it to go mad with fright and throw me if it smelt the elephant.

The orderly came back in a few minutes with a rifle and five cartridges, and meanwhile some Burmans had arrived and told us that the elephant was in the paddy fields below, only a few hundred yards away. As I started forward practically the whole population of the quarter flocked out of the houses and followed me. They had seen the rifle and were all shouting excitedly that I was going to shoot the elephant. […]

It made me vaguely uneasy. I had no intention of shooting the elephant – I had merely sent for the rifle to defend myself if necessary – and it is always unnerving to have a crowd following you. I marched down the hill, looking and feeling a fool, with the rifle over my shoulder and an ever-growing army of people jostling at my heels. […]

I had halted on the road. As soon as I saw the elephant I knew with perfect certainty that I ought not to shoot him. It is a serious matter to shoot a working elephant – it is comparable to destroying a huge and costly piece of machinery – and obviously one ought not to do it if it can possibly be avoided. And at that distance, peacefully eating, the elephant looked no more dangerous than a cow. I thought then and I think now that his attack of \”must\” was already passing off; in which case he would merely wander harmlessly about until the mahout [the elephant trainer] came back and caught him. Moreover, I did not in the least want to shoot him. I decided that I would watch him for a little while to make sure that he did not turn savage again, and then go home.

But at that moment I glanced round at the crowd that had followed me. It was an immense crowd, two thousand at the least and growing every minute. It blocked the road for a long distance on either side. I looked at the sea of yellow faces above the garish clothes-faces all happy and excited over this bit of fun, all certain that the elephant was going to be shot. They were watching me as they would watch a conjurer about to perform a trick. They did not like me, but with the magical rifle in my hands I was momentarily worth watching. And suddenly I realized that I should have to shoot the elephant after all. The people expected it of me and I had got to do it; I could feel their two thousand wills pressing me forward, irresistibly. And it was at this moment, as I stood there with the rifle in my hands, that I first grasped the hollowness, the futility of the white man\’s dominion in the East. Here was I, the white man with his gun, standing in front of the unarmed native crowd – seemingly the leading actor of the piece; but in reality I was only an absurd puppet pushed to and fro by the will of those yellow faces behind. I perceived in this moment that when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys. He becomes a sort of hollow, posing dummy, the conventionalized figure of a sahib. For it is the condition of his rule that he shall spend his life in trying to impress the \”natives,\” and so in every crisis he has got to do what the \”natives\” expect of him. He wears a mask, and his face grows to fit it. I had got to shoot the elephant. I had committed myself to doing it when I sent for the rifle. A sahib has got to act like a sahib; he has got to appear resolute, to know his own mind and do definite things. To come all that way, rifle in hand, with two thousand people marching at my heels, and then to trail feebly away, having done nothing – no, that was impossible. The crowd would laugh at me. And my whole life, every white man\’s life in the East, was one long struggle not to be laughed at. […] When I pulled the trigger I did not hear the bang or feel the kick – one never does when a shot goes home – but I heard the devilish roar of glee that went up from the crowd. […]

Afterwards, of course, there were endless discussions about the shooting of the elephant. The owner was furious, but he was only an Indian and could do nothing. Besides, legally I had done the right thing, for a mad elephant has to be killed, like a mad dog, if its owner fails to control it. Among the Europeans opinion was divided. The older men said I was right, the younger men said it was a damn shame to shoot an elephant for killing a coolie, because an elephant was worth more than any damn Coringhee coolie. And afterwards I was very glad that the coolie had been killed; it put me legally in the right and it gave me a sufficient pretext for shooting the elephant. I often wondered whether any of the others grasped that I had done it solely to avoid looking a fool.

Please answer the following questions about the story that you have just read.

1. The action takes place in

India.
Burma.
England.
South Africa.

2. The narrator

is very popular.
is hated by large numbers of people.
loves his job.
hates the local population.

3. The narrator believes that British imperial rule is

necessary to educate the local population.
the natural order of things.
an evil that he doesn’t really want to be a part of.
just perfect because it will make him rich.

4. The reason why the narrator begins to think about the nature of imperialism is that

an elephant has ravaged the bazaar.
he has to kill a man.
everybody is extremely poor.
he can never be alone.

5. The local population can’t handle the dangerous situation because

they are too afraid.
they can’t come to a decision.
they are just too inactive by nature to do anything about it.
they don’t have any weapons.

6. The worst thing that happens is that the elephant

runs away.
starts chasing a group of children.
kills a man in a very disturbing manner.
destroys a house.

7. Shooting the elephant is

good because it provides lots of food for the hungry population.
similar to destroying expensive machinery.
necessary because the elephant always eats the farmers’ crops.
something that has be done to make sure that there aren’t too many elephants around.

8. Just before the narrator shoots the elephant, he realizes that

the white men, who rule the colony, are in fact ruled by the local population.
killing the elephant will make him feel like a man.
white men and locals ought to be equals.
elephants are amazing creatures with feelings that should be respected.

9. The narrator shoots the elephant because

he wants to make sure that the locals remember him always.
it makes him feel powerful.
he finds it amusing.
he doesn’t want to look like a fool.

10. The furious owner can’t do anything about the shooting of his elephant because

elephants are worthless creatures.
white men can do whatever they like.
he is only an Indian, and the narrator has legally done the right thing.
according to the law no Indian can file a complaint against a white man.

Please choose the correct option for each sentence.

1. The reason that they complained ______ known.

wasn’t
weren’t

2. 9 months ______ a long time to wait for a baby.

is
are

3. There _____ multiple reasons why many people think Messi is the best player ever.

is
are

4. The police ______ just been given the right to frisk people without reason.

has
have

5. ______the wife or the husband going to change that smelly diaper?

is
are

6. We have long _____ that you have a problem with alcohol.

know
knew
known
knowed
knowing

7. I see that you’ve ______ my pancakes!

eat
eats
ate
eated
aten
eaten

8. I’m sick and tired of him ______ up my misfortune constantly.

bring
brings
bringing
brought
bringed
brang

9. _______ whether to get children or not is the most important choice you’ll ever make.

choose
choosing
chose
chosen
chosing

10. Last year she ______ on to a hope that seemed impossible.

cling
clings
clang
clung
clinged
clinging

11. Italian women are _________ for their beauty.

famous
famously

12. She is the most __________ gifted woman that I’ve ever come across.

amazingly
amazing

13. We’ll play along until your ______ game becomes too boring.

terrible
terribly
terriblely

14. I swear to God that she is a _______ cook.

magnificent
magnificently

15. It was clear to see that she was _________ in love with her Gucci bag.

desperate
desperately

16. I know _______ fault it is that you didn’t show up yesterday

who
whose
which
that

17. In _______ of these stores can I find pencils?

whom
that
which
whose

18. This uncomfortable chair, ______ by the way is quite expensive, ought to be burned.

there
that
which
who

19. I want to marry a man ______ will do all the household chores and let me relax on the couch.

there
who
whom
which

20. We’ll never find out _____ it was exactly that scratched my car.

which
what
that
whose

21. Don’t you just love to hear those cute _______ voices when they sing together?

childrens
childs
child’s
children’s
childrens’

22. The special _______ talent is that he diverts attention from his players.

once
onces
ones
one’s
one

23. It was the guy who lives next _____ decision to paint his house pink.

door
doors
door’s
door’

The following sentences have been jumbled. Please reconstruct the sentences in order for them to make sense.

(Correct sentences)
1. To be honest I would love to go out with your sister.

2. Playing around will only result in a lot of trouble.

3. Next year I know that I am going to win the big prize.

4. When we arrived yesterday he had performed his sketch.